Space to Redecorate

My last post was about telling the truth—my truth—how I really feel, how recovery from transplant is progressing, how the timeline is not what I expected it to be.

The adage, “the truth will set you free”, is, well, true.

Once I had committed my truth to paper, once I had shared it—I felt a tremendous sense of relief, like I could breathe again. The weight on my shoulders was a bit lighter.

It—how I felt—wasn’t a secret anymore.

I didn’t have to pretend that everything was wonderful or even okay.

Perhaps the most surprising change is that telling the truth created space in my heart. The space isn’t a hole. My heart isn’t empty or missing something. There’s just more room in it for feelings other than fear and defeat. It’s only been a week, but I’ve decided to redecorate that space with beautiful moments and images.

Among those images, is the view from our front door.

Our house is surrounded, on two sides, by thick cedar hedges. A few deciduous trees have tried to grow amidst the cedar, stretching taller and taller to reach the sun’s warm rays. Wild grape vines cling to the cedars for support.

morning hedges

The only clear view we have is out the front door and windows, which face the road and an unmown field beyond it. To me, there’s something magical about fields. I could probably attribute this affinity to the French-Canadian habitant in my bones and in my ancestry. The field’s grass is tall now, shining golden at mid-day (this photo doesn’t do it justice). Milkweed is interspersed, attracting butterflies of all colors and varieties. I smile whenever I see a winged pair fluttering between the wildflowers.

Bambi, and his friends, would say that they’re “twitterpated”.

morning field

This attempt to redecorate my heart with beautiful moments reminds me of a song that I used to listen to when I was younger. In fact, after my last chemotherapy infusion (the first time that I had cancer), I blasted the song on my brother’s stereo. Even back then, my brother, a talented musician, had plenty of speakers; I put them to good use that afternoon.

The song that this view, that this moment in my life, evokes is entitled, “Beauty from Pain”. It’s by the Christian rock band, Superchick. Some of the lyrics are as thus:

                        After all this has passed

                        I still will remain.

                        After I’ve cried my last,

                        There’ll be beauty from pain.

                        Though it won’t be today

                        Someday I’ll hope again.

                        And there’ll be beauty from pain.

                        You will bring beauty from my pain.

Although the song makes me tear up, I also find it to be empowering. Hopeful. In many ways, it’s a reminder that I can keep going…that God will use this experience for good, and that my current health situation will not be my situation forever. My transformation as a person isn’t complete yet.

As the proverb on my home page reads, “just when the caterpillar thought the world was over, it became a butterfly”. I’m still in the process of becoming a butterfly.

Thank you, Dear Readers, for your continued prayers, love, and light. They are so very appreciated. We’re Boston-bound later this week for a transplant check-up and a breathing test (it’s standard procedure; I am not worried about my lungs, nor are my doctors). Please continue to send positive thoughts, though; as some of you know, Massachusetts’ traffic can be daunting. Thank you, thank you, thank you.

 

With Love,

Laura

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Poop

poop pillow

I can’t believe I am going to write about this—the middle school girl inside of me is giggling at the subject—but I think there’s something to be learned from my recent experience with laxatives. Don’t worry; I won’t go into detail except to explain that many of the anti-nausea medications and chemotherapy that I take as part of my treatment plan can cause constipation. Poop—consistent poop—is part of the cancer world and when that consistency vanishes, the doctors and nurses have plenty of suggestions on how to bring it back. The use of Magnesium Citrate (very similar to preparing for a colonoscopy) is one of those options.

This post, though, really isn’t about bowel movements. It’s about holding on to things that maybe we shouldn’t hold on to—things that weigh us down, that slow our personal growth, that make us sick.

As an anxious person, I hold on to a lot of things that I shouldn’t. I repeat conversations (usually awkward ones) addendum. I worry about anything and everything (i.e. did we leave the stove on? Is there room in my budget for this? I’m cold; do I have a fever again?).

I hold on to dreams that no longer fit: jeans that are too small, shoes that were never comfortable to begin with, art supplies that I have “plans” for and then never utilize.

I also hold on to fear itself. For instance, when we went to Boston for the initial bone marrow transplant consultation, we were given a binder FULL of information regarding transplants. Instead of reading through it, I’ve kept the binder on the coffee table, allowing myself to panic every time I pass by it. The healthier thing to do would be to read the binder, write down questions, and contact the transplant nurse with those questions. But I haven’t done that. I’ve clung to being afraid of the process, to ignorance, to being overwhelmed by everything that needs to be accomplished between now and the transplant.

Not to make excuses, but it’s often easier to hold on to what’s known (and may or may not be healthy for us) than to let go of old hurts, too-small dreams and worries. It’s moments like these—when we’re bogged down by these things—that we need someone to come along with a bottle of hypothetical Magnesium Citrate. Is the cleansing process going to suck? Hell yeah. It’s going to burn. You’re going to question why you’re doing this cleanse, why you hate yourself so much. On the other side, though, is an opportunity to carry a little less of a burden. There’s a chance to create room for new dreams, new memories, positive experiences and growth.

As some of you are already aware, treatment did not go as planned this week. On Monday, I was scheduled to receive an infusion through my chest port, an infusion through my Ommaya Reservoir, and shots of chemotherapy to my legs. My counts were too low, however, for me to receive anything except the infusion through my chest port. I spent yesterday (Tuesday) receiving 2 units of blood and a unit of platelets instead. I feel a little more human, but time (in a couple of hours actually) will tell if the infusions were enough to bump up my numbers and restart treatment.  I can’t say I am looking forward to getting chemotherapy injected into my legs, but each dose brings us a little closer to the end goal.

Please keep us in your thoughts. There are days when this treatment protocol weighs on us, when the light at the end of the tunnel seems farther away than it did just the moment before. Please send light, love and healing thoughts whenever possible. We can’t do this without you.

 

With Love, Laura