May Flowers

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As I write this, afternoon sunshine fills ours porch—and it warms my skin, the borrowed blood and platelets in my veins, my bones. The last few days, in fact, have brought an unexpected amount of sunshine and good news:

  1. My last IT chemotherapy infusion through my Ommaya Reservoir (unicorn horn) came back cancer-free—meaning I now only have to have one IT infusion per week for the remainder of Course II. We are now one step closer to Boston and one step closer to bone marrow transplant!
  2. I had my first ice cream of the summer and it was delicious.
  3. They weren’t impressed by us, but we were able to visit with Wallace the Wonderful and Alderaan this weekend.
  4. Seth and I are now engaged!!!!!!! For a variety of reasons, I was having a rough afternoon emotionally this past Friday. Sometimes the ugliness of this situation sneaks up on you, but it’s those moments—when things seem at their toughest—that the really good things happen. My (now) fiancé got down on one knee and proposed to me (with a ring that has apparently been hidden somewhere in this apartment for a while. Considering that I fold and put away the laundry, I know the ring wasn’t in his sock drawer).

All of these good things—combined with the warm sunshine—they are utterly overwhelming and wonderful. In many ways, I feel as though I have grown accustomed to hardships, to disappointment, and yet, in the course of a few days, my heart has swollen up with happiness again. April’s showers might just bring May flowers after all.

Seth and I ask, though, that you continue to keep us in your thoughts. While any step closer to Boston is a positive step, it is also tremendously terrifying. I discovered late this past week that upon my arrival in Boston, I will have to have a Hickman Catheter placed on the other side of my chest. It’s my understanding that the Hickman Catheter looks like a super-sized IV. It will have three nozzles hanging off of it; two of these nozzles will be in constant use (chemotherapy, the actual transplant, while the third will be used only if I have difficulty with nutritional in-take). My power port will also be accessed at all times. I hate the idea of having yet another device—especially an external one—but in this instance, I have no choice.

(I will have to, at some point, write about the hit your self-esteem takes during cancer treatment—just not today.)

We also ask that you send good vibes that a donor is found. Unfortunately, my brother was not a match for me, but we have been informed that there are multiple potential matches in the National Bone Marrow Registry. The search is on!

Please continue sending light and love. It is so, so appreciated.

With Love, Laura

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Poop

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I can’t believe I am going to write about this—the middle school girl inside of me is giggling at the subject—but I think there’s something to be learned from my recent experience with laxatives. Don’t worry; I won’t go into detail except to explain that many of the anti-nausea medications and chemotherapy that I take as part of my treatment plan can cause constipation. Poop—consistent poop—is part of the cancer world and when that consistency vanishes, the doctors and nurses have plenty of suggestions on how to bring it back. The use of Magnesium Citrate (very similar to preparing for a colonoscopy) is one of those options.

This post, though, really isn’t about bowel movements. It’s about holding on to things that maybe we shouldn’t hold on to—things that weigh us down, that slow our personal growth, that make us sick.

As an anxious person, I hold on to a lot of things that I shouldn’t. I repeat conversations (usually awkward ones) addendum. I worry about anything and everything (i.e. did we leave the stove on? Is there room in my budget for this? I’m cold; do I have a fever again?).

I hold on to dreams that no longer fit: jeans that are too small, shoes that were never comfortable to begin with, art supplies that I have “plans” for and then never utilize.

I also hold on to fear itself. For instance, when we went to Boston for the initial bone marrow transplant consultation, we were given a binder FULL of information regarding transplants. Instead of reading through it, I’ve kept the binder on the coffee table, allowing myself to panic every time I pass by it. The healthier thing to do would be to read the binder, write down questions, and contact the transplant nurse with those questions. But I haven’t done that. I’ve clung to being afraid of the process, to ignorance, to being overwhelmed by everything that needs to be accomplished between now and the transplant.

Not to make excuses, but it’s often easier to hold on to what’s known (and may or may not be healthy for us) than to let go of old hurts, too-small dreams and worries. It’s moments like these—when we’re bogged down by these things—that we need someone to come along with a bottle of hypothetical Magnesium Citrate. Is the cleansing process going to suck? Hell yeah. It’s going to burn. You’re going to question why you’re doing this cleanse, why you hate yourself so much. On the other side, though, is an opportunity to carry a little less of a burden. There’s a chance to create room for new dreams, new memories, positive experiences and growth.

As some of you are already aware, treatment did not go as planned this week. On Monday, I was scheduled to receive an infusion through my chest port, an infusion through my Ommaya Reservoir, and shots of chemotherapy to my legs. My counts were too low, however, for me to receive anything except the infusion through my chest port. I spent yesterday (Tuesday) receiving 2 units of blood and a unit of platelets instead. I feel a little more human, but time (in a couple of hours actually) will tell if the infusions were enough to bump up my numbers and restart treatment.  I can’t say I am looking forward to getting chemotherapy injected into my legs, but each dose brings us a little closer to the end goal.

Please keep us in your thoughts. There are days when this treatment protocol weighs on us, when the light at the end of the tunnel seems farther away than it did just the moment before. Please send light, love and healing thoughts whenever possible. We can’t do this without you.

 

With Love, Laura

Change

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Dear Readers,

Writing, for me, tends to be best accomplished when the sun has not yet risen and the world is still half-asleep. Morning is the time of the day when I do my best thinking, when words come a little easier to me. It’s the time of day when a large cup of coffee holds magic, when the curved back of a sleeping cat puts life into perspective.

It’s rare that I sit down to write at night. And, yet, that’s exactly when this particular blogpost was written. These words found their place on my computer screen, not when the shadows in the room were shortening, but when they began to grow longer. They came to me in the absence of both coffee and of our cats (the boys are still on vacation at their grandparents’ house). I’d say that writing in the evening is a strange development, but, considering that most of my usual habits have been pitched out of the window, is it so strange?

Wallace and I March 2017
(Not the most flattering picture of Wallace the Wonderful and I, but we were briefly reunited last week!)

As many of you know, this last month has been one of tremendous change. I crossed the mysterious border separating the healthy and the ill, reacquiring a diagnosis of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL). I wear a leg brace on my lower left leg now, because the tumor has caused some neurological damage to that foot. At different points in the last thirty days, I have had varying hairstyles—my natural locks, dyed red hair, and now only a soft stubble (which will probably fall out in the next week or two). I went from being device-free to having both a chest port and an Ommaya Reservoir in my head.

Change, it seems, is the rule of my days.

This constant inconsistency has been, I will admit, a bit unnerving. There are moments when it’s hard to digest everything that has happened and everything that will happen, but change is also a powerful teacher.

What do I mean by that? Well, each day presents me with a new set of changes and/or challenges; my problem-solving skills have never been so well-utilized! Can’t drink coffee because it’s too acidic? Add Ovaltine to it and only drink three-fourths of a cup (so I can still get my caffeine fix). Can’t have big meals due to nausea? Eat small snacks. Can’t get rid of the smell of the hospital? Explore aromatherapy and diffusing essential oils.

The fact that so much of my life—and my subsequent treatment plan—seems to err on the side of impermanence is also teaching me about flexibility. In truth, I really don’t know what I am doing for treatment beyond next week. My schedule looks like this:

Thursday – Chemo via the Ommaya and a bone marrow biopsy

Monday – Initial consult in Boston for the bone marrow transplant and tissue-typing

Tuesday – More chemo via the Ommaya

Beyond that? Well, there are ideas including a chemotherapy regimen that stretches into June and a course of radiation at the end of it, but all of that could change depending on the results of both the biopsy and the consult in Boston. Is that anxiety-provoking? Absolutely! I am a planner. I don’t like not knowing what’s going to happen, but this is a reality I have to learn to live with. To accept. To somehow survive and thrive in.

And, that, maybe is why I wrote this at night—to reassure myself that change, even when it is uncomfortable, can be positive. It doesn’t always have to be feared; it can be a tool to make us more adaptable. Maybe change can even be embraced; it can be a yoga partner, teaching us to stretch ourselves open up to new asanas and possibilities.

Tomorrow is going to be a difficult day, Dear Readers. Bone marrow biopsies are not pleasant experiences. Please pray that the procedure goes smoothly. Please pray that the results are in my favor. And, if you are able, please send light and love.

 

With Love, Laura

 

 

The Good That Each Moment Holds

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Dear Readers,

I am writing this blogpost from the comfort of our own apartment. Sunlight is streaming through the glass, front door and the washing machine is humming in the background. I am surrounded by familiar landmarks—photographs, giant coffee mugs, and piles and piles of both read and unread books.

This feels normal.

This feels good.

If I weren’t bundled up in a sweater and layer of blankets, if I wasn’t fighting nausea, if I wasn’t struggling for control of my left leg, I could almost forget that I have cancer. I could almost forget that I have to return to the outpatient cancer clinic tomorrow for still more chemotherapy.

Almost.

The gravity of the situation sneaks up on me, Dear Readers. It surfaces when I least expect it to, knocking the air out of my lungs. It makes me cry—almost daily—and always in the evenings when the punch of the steroids begins to fade and the exhaustion creeps in. It tries to steal the joy still inherent in my days…but I won’t let it win.

Not today.

Not tomorrow.

Not ever.

As difficult as my current circumstances are, there is still so much to be thankful for. There are blessings hidden in each hour. Every new day that I wake up to is an opportunity for grace and gratitude. AND that is what I will focus on—not on the future, not on whether or not this treatment plan is going to work in the long-term—but on the good that each moment holds.

Will it be easy? No. Absolutely not. I am going to have emotional meltdowns and days that I can’t leave my bed. Tears will be shed. Sobs will be stifled by pillows. It is in these moments that I will remind myself that life still has beauty and that no matter how difficult this journey is, it is worth it.

Tomorrow, I return to the Hematology/Oncology Outpatient Clinic for two different chemotherapies; one will be administered through my Ommaya Reservoir (my off-centered unicorn horn) while the other will be infused through my chest port. On Tuesday, I will take my last mega dose of steroids (yay!). On Thursday, providing my white blood cell count is high enough, I will receive another dose of chemotherapy through the Ommaya as well as undergo a bone marrow biopsy. The results of that biopsy will shape next week’s treatment plan.

On April 3rd, my significant other and I will travel to Boston for the initial bone marrow transplant and tissue-typing consult.

I will need your continued support, Dear Readers, through all of this. I will need your prayers. I will need all the light and love that you can spare. I will do my best to keep you up-to-date, but please know that if you don’t hear from me, I am undoubtedly thinking about you and continuing to count YOU as a blessing.

With Love, Laura

Chomping on the Bit

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Dear Readers,

I have been an inpatient on the cancer floor for over 3 weeks now.

I’m not sure where the time has gone…or, really, how I’ve spent it. I’m at a loss for what I’ve been doing or how I’ve been surviving this. Time seems to move both slowly and quickly here, measured not so much by the date on the calendar but by blood counts and chemotherapy drugs. It’s measured in new hardware—a chest power port and the Ommaya Reservoir in my head—and the fact that I can now strap on my own leg brace without assistance. It’s marked by meals that are starting to taste like metal. It’s spent coloring and reading three pages at a time (because the Ommaya still gives me bouts of motion sickness).

I look out the window a lot.

There’s an office across the courtyard and at this time of day, when the security lights are on but before the sun rises, I can see inside of it. There’s artwork on the wall and a vase of giant red flowers. I think I can make out the corner of a well-stocked bookshelf. It’s the sort of place that’s perfect for writing, for quiet contemplation.

Contemplation is something that I have been avoiding recently. True, being ill might be the perfect time to take stock of one’s life, reassess goals, make bright and happy plans for the future—but those hopeful thoughts have shadows.

What if the treatment stops working?

What if I never get to go home?

What if this is what the rest of my life looks like—tubes hanging out of my chest, 6 am blood draws, massive doses of steroids?

I want to live. I want to see what life is like on the other side of this…but, if I am being honest, I still don’t have the strength to endure this treatment. There are days when I think that I might have the resolve to do it—that there’s some steel left in my soul—but then there are mornings like this morning, and I know I am drained. There’s barely enough fight left in me to take a sponge bath or choke down a carton of milk. I know I still need you, Dear Readers, spoon-feeding me encouragement and strength. Prayers work. Good vibes mean something here; they permeate the hospital walls, they chase gloomy thoughts to the far corners of the room, they make the minutes pass a bit more gently. And I wouldn’t be here without them.

Without you, I wouldn’t be making progress.

The week ahead may look different for me. There’s chemo involved, of course—and heaping helpings of steroids still—but there is a small chance, Dear Readers, that the next step in the process has arrived. I may be discharged from the hospital as early as this afternoon (if treatment goes smoothly and if we can be exceptionally persuasive).

Am I excited? I am so very excited at this small measure of freedom! I will be free to leave the confines of the hospital, returning to the outpatient cancer clinic at least three times a week for both the heavy-hitting chemotherapies and injections into my Ommaya Reservoir (because, although the tumor is shrinking, it’s still there, circulating cancer blasts in my central nervous system). I will reside at the wonderful Hope Lodge—a move that will allow me to share the same room with my significant other, to have some comfort even though I am far, far away from our apartment, from Wallace the Wonderful, and from Alderaan.

Please pray that this change happens, Dear Readers. I will miss my inpatient care team, but in many ways, since this possibility was first mentioned, I feel as though I have become more and more horse-like, chomping on my bit. It’s as if the windows that don’t open now have drafts and I can smell the promise of spring. I need more of it. Please continue to send well-wishes. Please keep us in your thoughts.

You are carrying us through this process—one step at a time.

 

With Love, Laura

Gratitude & Homesickness Hold Hands

 

I slept through most of Blizzard Stella. As the storm’s fluffy snowflakes began to drift earthward, I let the pre-medications and chemotherapy take me away. I burrowed underneath my hospital blankets while my significant other stretched out in the recliner beside my bed. I closed my eyes, falling asleep to the sound of his breathing.

I’ve missed the sound of him sleeping.

Maybe that’s a strange thing to say or to miss…but I do. I miss the comfort of each inhalation and exhalation. I miss walking into our apartment living room, to find him sprawled out on the couch, mouth wide open, reddish hair sticking up in every possible direction.

I am homesick this morning, Dear Readers—for all of the little things that make our life beautiful. I miss the sound of Wallace the Wonderful and Alderaan charging through the living room on the way to their food dishes. I miss the squeal of the tea kettle and the giant mug in the cupboard that reads, “I Freaking Love You”. I miss the scent of our laundry detergent. I miss the taste of chocolate chia pudding (with a dash of cayenne and cinnamon in it).

I miss my clothes.

I miss feeling comfortable in my own my body—the body that didn’t have a 24/7 accessed chest port or an off-centered unicorn horn sticking out of her head.

I miss my life.

Most days, I try not to think about home. I try not to think about the future at all. Yet, here I am, pinning for the comfort of a thick sweater and the orange glow of the Himalayan Salt Lamp in our bedroom. I find myself wondering if my immune system will allow us to fill our screened-in porch with flowers again or if I’ll even be able to sit outside in the sun, sans mask, to write.

It’s the little things that make a life wonderful…and it’s all the little things that I am missing today.

If I am being honest, Dear Readers, I know why this is happening. We received good news yesterday—the tumor is shrinking! Treatment is working! My oncologist is reaching back out to his colleagues in Boston (where I will eventually be transferred) and additional plans for my ongoing treatment will be made. And, while I am beyond relieved and grateful for these positive developments, it makes my status as a hospital inpatient a bit more difficult to bear. It makes the clock’s hands tick louder. It makes each infusion and injection feel a bit more important…because I want each subsequent treatment to work just as well as the preceding ones. I feel as though there is pressure building, an impatience for this cancer to be gone, because I want to be home. I want to be healthy. I want this chapter of my life to finally close and be behind me once and for all.

I don’t mean to sound like an ingrate. I know that this is the privilege of good medicine and responsive genes allowing me the luxury of homesickness. I know, that even in this sadness and discomfort, that I am profoundly blessed.

And, maybe that’s the lesson of this day: that gratitude and homesickness can hold hands. That having something to be grateful for, having hopes and dreams for the future wouldn’t be as sweet if not tempered by the prospect of loss. That, even amid our uglier emotions, there is an opportunity to cultivate still more gratitude and grace.

I hope this week has been kind to you, Dear Readers. I hope, that if you find yourself in a situation of mixed emotions, that you give yourself permission to feel or at least acknowledge the existence of both. Because we’re human, because we’re beautifully complex, because our emotions are a part of our experience here.

As always, thank you for your continued prayers, warm wishes and good thoughts. They are working! I can’t do this without you.

With So Much Love to You, Laura

The hours after…

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In the hours after my Ommaya Reservoir was surgically placed, I sobbed. A wave of grief and tears rushed at me, clinging to me as fiercely as the blood and the betadine that coated my scalp. I thought I had made peace with the fact that I would be a unicorn with an off-centered horn. I thought I was emotionally and mentally ready for this step.

It turns out that “ready” doesn’t exist.

“Ready” is the lie we tell ourselves in order to take the next, necessary step.

In the days after my Ommaya Reservoir was placed, I dry heaved. I slept a lot. I discovered that staring at screens for even short periods of time results in something akin to motion sickness. Writing this blogpost has been a form of medieval torture. Even reading is a hazardous pastime now. I have been told that these side-effects, so similar to those of having a concussion, should diminish with time. My brain and the Ommaya will eventually find some easy equilibrium. This—the pain, the slight swelling, the difficulty doing those things that usually nourish my soul—all of it is temporary.

And that, Dear Readers, is the mantra that carried me through the weekend: that this is temporary.

This discomfort is temporary.

This treatment, although a thousand times more arduous than my first cancer treatment, is temporary.

This cancer is temporary.

What do I mean by all that? Well, the first thing you should know is that at this hospital, Hematology/Oncology inpatients are visited daily by a team of attending physicians, fellows, medical students, and nurses. The faces comprising the team usually cycle out on a weekly basis. Team members also change every weekend (because even superheroes need days off). It was during this last weekend rotation, that the Hematologist/Oncologist that cared for me likened my cancer relapse to a temporary and oh-so-beautifully ordinary situation: that of a clogged sink.

At some unknown moment during the past few months, my bone marrow began to flow with cancer blasts, just as an open spigot would. Normally, leaving a faucet running might not be a problem, but sinks sometimes plug up. Sometimes, they stop draining altogether. My spinal cord, Dear Readers, stopped draining. It plugged up with a tumor. Water sloshed over the sink’s basin, spilling onto the floor in the form of pain, lost flexibility, impaired mobility.

Like any clogged sink, though, there are things that we can do to resolve the situation.

There are towels down on the floor, now, sopping up the spillage. Each injection of chemotherapy into my Ommaya Reservoir will clear still more of the tumor from my spinal cord, allowing the sink to drain down. Each dose of systemic chemotherapy administered through the power port in my chest will clean the cancer out of my bone marrow, shutting off the spigot’s flow.

Eventually the sink will drain.

Eventually it will dry out.

Eventually it will be ready for a bone marrow transplant.

So, yes, in the hours after my Ommaya Reservoir was placed, I sobbed. In the days after the surgery, I have struggled with nausea, fatigue and pain. But, eventually—in the weeks, in the months ahead—while shuffling one, unsteady foot in front of the other, I will regain some semblance of equilibrium. I will remind myself that “temporary” is, in actuality, a beautiful word. And, when I am too tired or in too much pain, I will simply close my eyes and conjure light. I will let it radiate within me, and out of me, flowing from the crown of my head like a unicorn’s silver and gold mane. I will let the love and strength you have gifted me, Dear Readers, gather in my newborn legs. I am, after all, a creature being remade.

I ask, once again, for you to send kind thoughts this upcoming week. Send light. Send love. Send strength.

This treatment plan is ugly, Dear Readers, and the days ahead of me are not easy ones. Now that the Ommaya Reservoir has been placed, the treatment regimen will intensify. I will be receiving harsher chemotherapies, nearly every day. This cancer will be shown no mercy…which means neither will I.

For now. Temporarily.

 

With Love, Laura

The Ommaya

 

Dear Readers,

It saddens me to write this, but you may not hear from me again until next week.

Due to the size and location of the tumor in my spinal cord, my treatment plan has followed an unconventional path. What would have been treated with injections of chemotherapy into my lumbar spine, had to be addressed with cervical neck (c-spine) injections—which, as I am sure you can imagine, are painful and are accompanied by a whole host of possible complications. So far, I have been blessed with smooth, uncomplicated procedures, but continuing the c-spine injections is not a viable or long-term solution. The placement of an Ommaya Reservoir is.

I am no expert on the Ommaya Reservoir—and the best way for me to describe it to you (and to myself) is to say simply that in some ways, it resembles the port currently imbedded in my chest. It will give my care team safer access to my spinal cord fluid. It can be accessed in an outpatient environment. It will cut down on the number of procedures that I will have to endure. It has a lower risk of infection.

The catch? The Ommaya Reservoir is, for lack of better term, a “head port”. Tomorrow, March 9th, 2017, I will go to the Operating Room where a team of talented neurosurgeons will remove a small piece of bone from my skull. They will place the Ommaya Reservoir in my head and then they will cover it again with my skin. I will be in recovery for a bit, hopefully transferred back to my room on the cancer floor before the day’s conclusion.

The Reservoir, when I lose my hair, will be noticeable. It’ll be a small bump that I will wear for the rest of my life. The Reservoir, once implanted, is usually not removed. It’s permanent. It will become a part of me—for however long I am here on this earth.

Dear Readers, there is so much going through my mind right now! Do I want to undergo brain surgery? Do I want a permanent implant in my head? Am I afraid of complications? Am I terrified that this thing is going to cause changes in my mental function and personality? That it might impact my writing abilities? Absolutely. The fear of it lingers in every blood cell in my body. It darts between my nerves. It is the thought lurking under every other thought I currently have.

I am so f*&king scared.

But this is forward motion. This surgery is a much-needed step toward healing. This implant is the avenue by which I will receive the medications that I need to survive—and, if it means I have to take these chances, that my vanity has to suffer a bit, then I will do it. I will wear that bump for the rest of my life and I when I see it the mirror—even through rivers of tears—I will thank God for it.

I am changing, Dear Readers…in ways I could not have anticipated. This Ommaya Reservoir, as bittersweet as it is, it will be my off-centered unicorn horn. It will be a source of healing and power. I will envision it as gateway for grace and for gratitude to pass through. Eventually, it will usher in the rebirth of beauty. I was, according to my brother, a phoenix the last time this cancer struck. This time, I am the unicorn slowly finding my legs.

If you have a moment over the next few days, Dear Readers, please spare me a kind thought. Pray for a safe and effective surgery. Pray for my care team, for my family, for the incredible man that has been holding my hand since this journey began. Send us love. Send us strength.

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We walked outside (for the first time since 2/25/17)!!

Your love makes a difference, Dear Readers. It is felt. Please keep it coming.

 

With Love, Laura

 

Blue Skies

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The sky, as seen from my hospital room window, is a beautiful blue today—the kind of blue that reminds me of summer evenings spent wading through dew-soaked grass in search of moths. It’s the same shade that occupies so much of my partner’s eyes. It’s the type of blue that whispers of happiness, of hope.

Today was better, Dear Readers. It consisted of a heaping helping of steroids, multiple doctors’ visits, and long-talks with social workers. My hours were spent making motivational art to hang in my room, talking with my mom, and laughing with a dear friend. I needed a day like today…and I am so, so grateful that I had it.

But, you’re seeing this blog tonight because I won’t be able to do my usual Monday post tomorrow. Tomorrow, I will be in Interventional Radiology, receiving yet another cervical injection of chemotherapy. Then, after that injection, I will receive still more chemotherapy—also injections, but to my legs.

Am I scared? Yes. I am frightened all the way to my cancer-filled marrow. Cervical injections are risky, painful—in fact, I would rank them as being more painful than even bone marrow biopsies—but this is a necessary evil. This evil is going to save me.

It amazes me, in my more detached moments, that pain can heal. That it can burn away disease. That out of these ashes, something whole and healthy and capable of thriving underneath brilliant, blue skies can emerge.

If you have a moment this Monday, Dear Readers, please spare a kind thought for me. Send blue skies. Send healing prayers. Send strength.

 

With Love, Laura

On Strength

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Dear Readers,

I had every intention to share something with you yesterday…but the day slipped away from me. The hinges on my door seemed to melt away, information and people spilling into my hospital room at a steady rate. There’s always so much to consider. So many decisions to make.

Yesterday was hard.

I thought it would be easy—the treatment protocol only called for steroids yesterday—but the medication makes my chest rumble with a grizzly bear’s impatience. It makes me feel like I am becoming rough, prickly, like the outside of a pineapple.  It’s the opposite of grace and gratitude, of everything that I hope to be in this life.

And maybe that’s the hardest part about cancer, Dear Readers—it’s not the drugs, or the fact that your body is trying to actively give up on you—it’s that cancer changes you. It steals whatever hope you had in youthful invincibility. It transforms your outer packaging, taking hair, fitness, any sense of self-worth and beauty you may have had. And, then, it tries to take your personality.

I could cry—whole rivers, whole lakes, maybe even an ocean. I walk this fine line between grace and hysteria, teetering over the edge from time to time. I sincerely wonder where I will find the strength to fight this, to outlive this disease this time.

The truth?

I realized that I can’t.

I can’t survive this—not without help.

I guess I can blame the chemo on making me a little sluggish on the epiphany-front, but that is the revelation that I had last night: that I can’t do this alone. I don’t have the strength, Dear Readers. My reserves were depleted the first time I faced this cancer…but it’s okay…because strength has more than one source. There is a vast reservoir of strength and love already out there, already in existence, already fully accessible. You can call it the Universe, The Divine, God—call it whatever feels good to you—but for me, it’s God, and He has the strength necessary to carry me through this storm.

You should know, Dear Readers, that you, too, have been spoon-feeding me strength.

Strength comes to me in your phone calls, messages, and pictures—always at just the right moment when I feel myself slipping. These daily doses of laughter, of hope, are as important as air, as steroids, as chemotherapy. Please keep them coming.

Because I’m not strong.

Maybe I never was.

But, it’s okay, because the strength that will see me through this isn’t coming from some personal, finite supply. It’s coming from God. And it’s coming from you.

With Love, Laura